Cooperative Extension San Joaquin County
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Cooperative Extension San Joaquin County

Posts Tagged: monarch

Of Presidents and Monarchs

A monarch on the American flag. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Happy Presidents' Day. It's day we honor not only George Washington and Abraham Lincoln but all the men (no women yet!) who have served as President of the United States. "The federal holiday honoring Washington was originally implemented by an Act of...

A monarch on the American flag. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A monarch on the American flag. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A monarch on the American flag. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Monday, February 18, 2019 at 5:48 PM

A Monarch Kind of Christmas

Last year at this time, we saw four monarchs eclose in our small-scale rearing project. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Merry Christmas has always been merry, but it's better with butterflies! Isn't everything better with butterflies? Last year, in our small-scale monarch rearing project here in Vacaville, Calif., we saw one monarch eclose on Saturday, Dec. 24, one on...

Last year at this time, we saw four monarchs eclose in our small-scale rearing project. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Last year at this time, we saw four monarchs eclose in our small-scale rearing project. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Last year this time, we saw four monarchs eclose in our small-scale rearing project. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A newly eclosed butterfly is a special holiday greeting. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A newly eclosed butterfly is a special holiday greeting. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A newly eclosed butterfly is a special holiday greeting. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A newly eclosed monarch spreads its wings. It's symbol of hope, love, joy, change, transformation, strength and endurance. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A newly eclosed monarch spreads its wings. It's symbol of hope, love, joy, change, transformation, strength and endurance. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A newly eclosed monarch spreads its wings. It's symbol of hope, love, joy, change, transformation, strength and endurance. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Monday, December 25, 2017 at 6:00 AM
Tags: butterfly (15), Christmas (1), Danaus plexippus (39), holiday (1), monarch (11)

Lady Beetles: The First Ladies of the Garden Having a Ball

A lady beetle feasts on aphids on a milkweed plant, Gomphocarpus physocarpus, also known as balloon-plant milkweed or hairy balls. Note the spiky hairs. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

See those red spots on your milkweed seed pods? Lady beetles (aka ladybugs or "garden heroes") are feasting on aphids. And they're having a ball. We've been watching the critters on our milkweed, Gomphocarpus physocarpus, for the last couple of...

A lady beetle feasts on aphids on a milkweed plant, Gomphocarpus physocarpus, also known as balloon-plant milkweed or hairy balls. Note the spiky hairs. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A lady beetle feasts on aphids on a milkweed plant, Gomphocarpus physocarpus, also known as balloon-plant milkweed or hairy balls. Note the spiky hairs. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A lady beetle feasts on aphids on a milkweed plant, Gomphocarpus physocarpus, also known as balloon-plant milkweed or hairy balls. Note the spiky hairs. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Peek-a-boo? Or peek-a-beetle? A lady beetle, resplendent in red, crawls through the spiky hairs of milkweed seed pods. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Peek-a-boo? Or peek-a-beetle? A lady beetle, resplendent in red, crawls through the spiky hairs of milkweed seed pods. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Peek-a-boo? Or peek-a-beetle? A lady beetle, resplendent in red, crawls through the spiky hairs of milkweed seed pods. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Hurry! A lady beetle snags aphids on a milkweed seed pod, while other aphids try to escape (far right). (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Hurry! A lady beetle snags aphids on a milkweed seed pod, while other aphids try to escape (far right). (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Hurry! A lady beetle snags aphids on a milkweed seed pod, while other aphids try to escape (far right). (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Wednesday, November 29, 2017 at 4:17 PM

Autumn's Majesty: Tithonia

A Gulf Fritillary, Agraulis vanillae, lands on a Mexican sunflower. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

If there's any flower that should be crowned "Autumn's Majesty," that would be the Mexican sunflower (Tithonia rotundifolia), aka "Torch."A member of the sunflower family (Asteraceae), it carries "the torch of life" throughout spring, summer and autumn,...

A Gulf Fritillary, Agraulis vanillae, lands on a Mexican sunflower. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A Gulf Fritillary, Agraulis vanillae, lands on a Mexican sunflower. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A Gulf Fritillary, Agraulis vanillae, lands on a Mexican sunflower. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

In a sea of nearly spent Mexican sunflowers, a lone migrating monarch, Danaus plexippus, finds food. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
In a sea of nearly spent Mexican sunflowers, a lone migrating monarch, Danaus plexippus, finds food. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

In a sea of nearly spent Mexican sunflowers, a lone migrating monarch, Danaus plexippus, finds food. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A honey bee, Apis mellifera, takes a liking to the Tithonia, aka Mexican sunflower. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A honey bee, Apis mellifera, takes a liking to the Tithonia, aka Mexican sunflower. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A honey bee, Apis mellifera, takes a liking to the Tithonia, aka Mexican sunflower. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A skipper, family Hesperiidae, hangs out on the Tithonia. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A skipper, family Hesperiidae, hangs out on the Tithonia. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A skipper, Hesperiidae, hangs out on the Tithonia. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The wings of a black hover fly or syrphid, aka
The wings of a black hover fly or syrphid, aka "Mexican cactus fly" (Copestylum mexicanum), gleam in the sunlight. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The wings of a black hover fly or syrphid, aka "Mexican cactus fly" (Copestylum mexicanum), gleam in the sunlight. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Predators hang out on the Mexican sunflower, too. A crab spider, family Thomisidae, waits for prey. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Predators hang out on the Mexican sunflower, too. A crab spider, family Thomisidae, waits for prey. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Predators hang out on the Mexican sunflower, too. A crab spider, family Thomisidae, waits for prey. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Wednesday, October 18, 2017 at 5:00 PM

The Monarch and the Mantis

A gravid praying mantis, her abdomen bloated, grabs a migrating monarch nectaring on a butterfly bush. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

If you're rearing monarchs or offering them a “way station” of nectar-producing flowers in your yard, there's one thing you don't want to see: A praying mantis nailing a monarch. That's when the "pollinator friendly garden" seems more like a...

A gravid praying mantis, her abdomen bloated, grabs a migrating monarch nectaring on a butterfly bush. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A gravid praying mantis, her abdomen bloated, grabs a migrating monarch nectaring on a butterfly bush. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A gravid praying mantis, her abdomen bloated, grabs a migrating monarch nectaring on a butterfly bush. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The praying mantis, perfectly camouflaged, resembles a leaf. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
The praying mantis, perfectly camouflaged, resembles a leaf. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The praying mantis, perfectly camouflaged, resembles a leaf. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A spiked foreleg circles the monarch's thorax. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A spiked foreleg circles the monarch's thorax. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A spiked foreleg circles the monarch's thorax. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The spiked foreleg pierces a wing. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
The spiked foreleg pierces a wing. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The spiked foreleg pierces a wing. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Wednesday, October 26, 2016 at 5:00 PM

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