Cooperative Extension San Joaquin County
University of California
Cooperative Extension San Joaquin County

Posts Tagged: pollinator

The Boys Are Back in Town!

A male Valley carpenter bee, Xylocopa varipuncta, nectaring on a tower of jewels, Echium wildpretii, in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The boys are back in town. After the long winter and rainy spring, the boys are back in town. That would be the male Valley carpenter bees, Xylocopa varipuncta, or what Robbin Thorp, distinguished emeritus professor of entomology at UC Davis, calls...

A male Valley carpenter bee, Xylocopa varipuncta, nectaring on a tower of jewels, Echium wildpretii, in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A male Valley carpenter bee, Xylocopa varipuncta, nectaring on a tower of jewels, Echium wildpretii, in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A male Valley carpenter bee, Xylocopa varipuncta, nectaring on a tower of jewels, Echium wildpretii, in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The male Valley carpenter bee is often mistaken for a bumble bee, or what some have called a
The male Valley carpenter bee is often mistaken for a bumble bee, or what some have called a "golden bumble bee." (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The male Valley carpenter bee is often mistaken for a bumble bee, or what some have called a "golden bumble bee." (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The male Valley carpenter bee didn't perceive the photographer as a threat. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
The male Valley carpenter bee didn't perceive the photographer as a threat. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The male Valley carpenter bee didn't perceive the photographer as a threat. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The male Valley carpenter bee protrudes his proboscis (tongue) to sip nectar from a tower of jewels, Echium wildpretii. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
The male Valley carpenter bee protrudes his proboscis (tongue) to sip nectar from a tower of jewels, Echium wildpretii. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The male Valley carpenter bee protrudes his proboscis (tongue) to sip nectar from a tower of jewels, Echium wildpretii. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

And off he goes, a male Valley carpenter bee in flight. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
And off he goes, a male Valley carpenter bee in flight. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

And off he goes, a male Valley carpenter bee in flight. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Syrphid Fly in Rock Purslane: When a House Is a Home

A syrphid fly, tucked in the folds of a rock purslane, Calandrinia grandiflora, sips nectar. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

When a house is a home... Take the case of a syrphid fly, aka hover fly or flower fly. It's a cold and windy day, and it's tucked in the folds of a rock purslane, Calandrinia grandiflora, in Vacaville, Calif.It's sipping nectar, and rotating its...

A syrphid fly, tucked in the folds of a rock purslane, Calandrinia grandiflora, sips nectar. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A syrphid fly, tucked in the folds of a rock purslane, Calandrinia grandiflora, sips nectar. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A syrphid fly, tucked in the folds of a rock purslane, Calandrinia grandiflora, sips nectar. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The syrphid fly rotates its body to gather more nectar glean more  sun. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
The syrphid fly rotates its body to gather more nectar glean more sun. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The syrphid fly rotates its body to gather more nectar glean more sun. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The syprhid is just about ready to take flight. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
The syprhid is just about ready to take flight. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The syprhid is just about ready to take flight. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Wednesday, November 21, 2018 at 11:00 AM
Tags: flower fly (12), hover fly (19), pollinator (4), rock purslane (18), syrphid fly (17), UC ANR (16)

Flies Are Pollinators, Too!

Close-up of a fly, genus Eristalis, on a flower. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

You may have noticed this little floral visitor in your garden. It might appear to be a bee, a common mistake to the untrained eye or those who think that all floral visitors are bees. But it's a fly, and flies are pollinators, too! This fly, from the...

Close-up of a fly, genus Eristalis, on a flower. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Close-up of a fly, genus Eristalis, on a flower. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Close-up of a fly, genus Eristalis, on a flower. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Flies are pollinators, too! This little Eristalis is nectaring a zinnia. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Flies are pollinators, too! This little Eristalis is nectaring a zinnia. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Flies are pollinators, too! This little Eristalis is nectaring a zinnia. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Side view of an Eristalis. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Side view of an Eristalis. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Side view of an Eristalis. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Thursday, September 20, 2012 at 9:04 PM

Visitor in the Garden

Visitor in the garden

The rain and wind took turns destroying the flowers in our garden last Sunday in a siege not unlike a scene from The Wrestler. The rock purslane (Calandrinia grandiflora) took a beating, but like Mickey Rourke, it will return.  Last year the...

Visitor in the garden
Visitor in the garden

This little critter, probably a native bee, seems to be glaring at the photographer. The flower is a rock purslane (Calandrinia grandiflora). (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Monday, February 23, 2009 at 6:32 PM
 
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