Cooperative Extension San Joaquin County
University of California
Cooperative Extension San Joaquin County

Posts Tagged: predator

Henrietta and the Drone Fly: The Predator and the Prey

Henrietta, our Stagmomantis limbata praying mantis, lies in wait on a Mexican sunflower (Tithonia.) (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Henrietta, our Stagmomantis limbata praying mantis, perches on a Mexican sunflower (Tithonia). She is as patient as she is persistent. The drone fly, aka syrphid and also known as a hover fly or flower fly, makes the fatal mistake of touching down on...

Henrietta, our Stagmomantis limbata praying mantis, lies in wait on a Mexican sunflower (Tithonia.) (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Henrietta, our Stagmomantis limbata praying mantis, lies in wait on a Mexican sunflower (Tithonia.) (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Henrietta, our Stagmomantis limbata praying mantis, lies in wait on a Mexican sunflower (Tithonia.) (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A drone fly (syrphid) lands on the blossom as a hungry praying mantis watches intently. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A drone fly (syrphid) lands on the blossom as a hungry praying mantis watches intently. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A drone fly (syrphid) lands on the blossom as a hungry praying mantis watches intently. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

One quick move and praying mantis has dinner. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
One quick move and praying mantis has dinner. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

One quick move and praying mantis has dinner. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The spiked forelegs hold the prey in place. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
The spiked forelegs hold the prey in place. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The spiked forelegs hold the prey in place. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

It's eat and be eaten in the garden. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
It's eat and be eaten in the garden. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

It's eat and be eaten in the garden. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Henrietta the praying mantis polishes off the last of the fly but a wing is visible evidence of what happened. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Henrietta the praying mantis polishes off the last of the fly but a wing is visible evidence of what happened. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Henrietta the praying mantis polishes off the last of the fly but a wing is visible evidence of what happened. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Thursday, November 8, 2018 at 5:00 PM
Focus Area Tags: Environment Food Yard & Garden

How Do Insects, Spiders React to a Partial Solar Eclipse?

A honey bee nectaring on African blue basil during the partial solar eclipse in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The sky darkens. The temperature drops several degrees. A breeze rustles the leaves of the African blue basil. Dogs bark. And off in the distance, a hawk shrills. A partial solar eclipse is about to happen in Vacaville, Calif. I am watching the...

A honey bee nectaring on African blue basil during the partial solar eclipse in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A honey bee nectaring on African blue basil during the partial solar eclipse in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A honey bee nectaring on African blue basil during the partial solar eclipse in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A praying mantis, a female Stagmomantis limbata (as identified by Andrew Pfeifer) lurks beneath a milkweed leaf during the partial eclipse in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A praying mantis, a female Stagmomantis limbata (as identified by Andrew Pfeifer) lurks beneath a milkweed leaf during the partial eclipse in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A praying mantis, a female Stagmomantis limbata (as identified by Andrew Pfeifer) lurks beneath a milkweed leaf during the partial eclipse in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A pollen-coated honey bee ignores the eclipse and forages on a Mexican sunflower (Tithonia). (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A pollen-coated honey bee ignores the eclipse and forages on a Mexican sunflower (Tithonia). (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A pollen-coated honey bee ignores the eclipse and forages on a Mexican sunflower (Tithonia). (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Two stink bugs on a bluebeard,Caryopteris x clandonensis. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Two stink bugs on a bluebeard,Caryopteris x clandonensis. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Two stink bugs on a bluebeard,Caryopteris x clandonensis. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

An assassin bug looking for prey. It's on a tropical milkweed. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
An assassin bug looking for prey. It's on a tropical milkweed. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

An assassin bug looking for prey. It's on a tropical milkweed. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A honey bee trapped in a web (and freed by the photographer). It was the spider's second catch of the day. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A honey bee trapped in a web (and freed by the photographer). It was the spider's second catch of the day. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A honey bee trapped in a web (and freed by the photographer). It was the spider's second catch of the day. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Monday, August 21, 2017 at 2:05 PM
Tags: eclipse (1), Eric Mussen (1), honey bee (3), milkweed (3), orbweaver (1), praying mantis (6), predator (11), prey (8), spider (1), Tithonia (2)

There's an Assassin in Your Garden

Can you find the nymph assassin bug on this Cleveland sage? This bug belongs to the genus Zelus. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Ever seen assassination attempts in your garden? They are not pretty if you're the prey. Neither are the successful attempts. Take the Zelus renardii, aka the leafhopper assassin bug. They've been hanging out in our nectarine tree, cosmos,...

Can you find the nymph assassin bug on this Cleveland sage? This bug belongs to the genus Zelus. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Can you find the nymph assassin bug on this Cleveland sage? This bug belongs to the genus Zelus. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Can you find the nymph assassin bug on this Cleveland sage? This bug belongs to the genus Zelus. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A nymph assassin bug strikes a pose on Cleveland sage. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A nymph assassin bug strikes a pose on Cleveland sage. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A nymph assassin bug strikes a pose on Cleveland sage. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

This adult assassin bug, Zelus renardii, is ready to ambush prey on a double cosmos blossom. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
This adult assassin bug, Zelus renardii, is ready to ambush prey on a double cosmos blossom. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

This adult assassin bug, Zelus renardii, is ready to ambush prey on a double cosmos blossom. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

This adult assassin bug lurks almost unnoticed on a Mexican sunflower, Tithonia. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
This adult assassin bug lurks almost unnoticed on a Mexican sunflower, Tithonia. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

This adult assassin bug lurks almost unnoticed on a Mexican sunflower, Tithonia. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The predator: the assassin bug. This one is lying in wait on a nectarine leaf. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
The predator: the assassin bug. This one is lying in wait on a nectarine leaf. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The predator: the assassin bug. This one is lying in wait on a nectarine leaf. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Gotcha! An assassin bug spears a male metallic sweat bee. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Gotcha! An assassin bug spears a male metallic sweat bee. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Gotcha! An assassin bug spears a male metallic sweat bee. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Friday, July 7, 2017 at 3:08 PM

Not a Good Day for the Jumping Spider

A honey bee narrowly avoids the outstretched jumping spider,  a Phidippus audax. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Sometimes you get lucky. Sometimes you go hungry. Take the case of the huge jumping spider (a female Phidippus audax or bold jumping spider, as identified by Wade Spencer of the UC Davis Bohart Museum of Entomology) hanging out in our Spanish lavender....

A honey bee narrowly avoids the outstretched jumping spider,  a Phidippus audax. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A honey bee narrowly avoids the outstretched jumping spider, a Phidippus audax. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A honey bee narrowly avoids the outstretched jumping spider, a Phidippus audax. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Oops, wrong direction! The jumping spider,Phidippus audax, is looking elsewhere as a bee arrives on the scene. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Oops, wrong direction! The jumping spider,Phidippus audax, is looking elsewhere as a bee arrives on the scene. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Oops, wrong direction! The jumping spider,Phidippus audax, is looking elsewhere as a bee arrives on the scene. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The jumping spider, Phidippus audax, climbs its mountain and lurks. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
The jumping spider, Phidippus audax, climbs its mountain and lurks. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The jumping spider, Phidippus audax, climbs its mountain and lurks. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The jumping spider, Phidippus audax, exits its summit, the Spanish lavender. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
The jumping spider, Phidippus audax, exits its summit, the Spanish lavender. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The jumping spider, Phidippus audax, exits its summit, the Spanish lavender. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Wednesday, March 29, 2017 at 3:08 PM

Where's the Praying Mantis?

Where's the praying mantis? Look closely on the milkweed and you'll find it. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

It's one of the most recognizable of all insects--if you can find it. Ever had someone poke you and point toward a plant: "Look, there's a praying mantis?" "Where?" "Right there. See it?" "No. Where is it? "Right there. It's right there. Can't you...

Where's the praying mantis? Look closely on the milkweed and you'll find it. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Where's the praying mantis? Look closely on the milkweed and you'll find it. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Where's the praying mantis? Look closely on the milkweed and you'll find it. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Time to climb. A praying mantis looking for prey on a milkweed. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Time to climb. A praying mantis looking for prey on a milkweed. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Time to climb. A praying mantis looking for prey on a milkweed. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A good spot to hang out. A praying mantis hanging upside down on a milkweed. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey
A good spot to hang out. A praying mantis hanging upside down on a milkweed. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey

A good spot to hang out. A praying mantis hanging upside down on a milkweed. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A praying mantis engages in a little grooming as it nears the top of a milkweed. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A praying mantis engages in a little grooming as it nears the top of a milkweed. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A praying mantis engages in a little grooming as it nears the top of a milkweed. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

On top of the world--on top of a milkweed. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
On top of the world--on top of a milkweed. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

On top of the world--on top of a milkweed. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Friday, August 12, 2016 at 4:47 PM

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