Cooperative Extension San Joaquin County
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Cooperative Extension San Joaquin County

Posts Tagged: queen bee

What's Better than Sighting a Bumble Bee?

A newly emerged yellow-faced bumble bee queen, Bombus vosnesenskii, eyes the photographer as it forages on blanket flower (Gaillardia). (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

What's better than sighting a yellow-faced bumble bee, Bombus vosnesenskii? Well, a newly emerged Bombus vosnesenskii queen. On the last day of June, we spotted this fresh queen-looking foraging on our blanket flower (Gaillardia). Her jet-black color,...

A newly emerged yellow-faced bumble bee queen, Bombus vosnesenskii, eyes the photographer as it forages on blanket flower (Gaillardia). (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A newly emerged yellow-faced bumble bee queen, Bombus vosnesenskii, eyes the photographer as it forages on blanket flower (Gaillardia). (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A newly emerged yellow-faced bumble bee queen, Bombus vosnesenskii, eyes the photographer as it forages on blanket flower (Gaillardia). (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Yellow-faced bumble bee shows its distinguishing marks. This is a queen Bombus vosnesenskii, about 21mm long. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Yellow-faced bumble bee shows its distinguishing marks. This is a queen Bombus vosnesenskii, about 21mm long. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Yellow-faced bumble bee shows its distinguishing marks. This is a queen Bombus vosnesenskii, about 21mm long. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Up and away! A distinguishing feature of Bombus vosnesenskii is the yellow stripe, T4 segment of its thorax. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Up and away! A distinguishing feature of Bombus vosnesenskii is the yellow stripe, T4 segment of its thorax. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Up and away! A distinguishing feature of Bombus vosnesenskii is the yellow stripe, T4 segment of its thorax. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Watching the Girls Go By

Honey bees making a

Pull up a chair and engage in a little "girl-watching." That is, honey bees heading home to their colony. Many beekeepers, especially beginning beekeepers, like to watch their worker bees--they call them "my girls"--come home. They're loaded with...

Honey bees making a
Honey bees making a "bee line" for their home. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Honey bees making a "bee line" for their home. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Note the load of yellow pollen. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Note the load of yellow pollen. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Note the load of yellow pollen. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Queen bee and her retinue. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Queen bee and her retinue. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Queen bee and her retinue. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Friday, March 28, 2014 at 11:47 PM
Tags: bee observation hive (6), drones (8), pollen (27), queen bee (10), worker bees (5)

Bee My Valentine

Queen bee (with dot) and worker bees. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

It's nice to remember the honey bee on Valentine's Day. You'll see many Valentine cards  inscribed with "Bee My Valentine" and featuring a photo of a bee. Many of those photos depict a queen bee, the mother of all bees in the hive. To be a queen,...

Queen bee (with dot) and worker bees. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Queen bee (with dot) and worker bees. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Queen bee (with dot) and worker bees. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Another queen bee in the Harry H. Laidlaw Jr. Honey Bee Research Facility. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Another queen bee in the Harry H. Laidlaw Jr. Honey Bee Research Facility. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Another queen bee in the Harry H. Laidlaw Jr. Honey Bee Research Facility. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The queen and her retinue. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
The queen and her retinue. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The queen and her retinue. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Thursday, February 14, 2013 at 8:33 PM

The 13 Bugs of Christmas

Golden bee (Italian subspecies of Apis mellifera) nectaring on lavender. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

It's Christmas Day and time to revisit  "The 13 Bugs of Christmas." Back in 2010, Extension apiculturist Eric Mussen of the UC Davis Department of Entomology and yours truly came up with a song about "The 13 Bugs of Christmas." Presented at the...

Golden bee (Italian subspecies of Apis mellifera) nectaring on lavender. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Golden bee (Italian subspecies of Apis mellifera) nectaring on lavender. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Golden bee (Italian subspecies of Apis mellifera) nectaring on lavender. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Queen bee emerging. Beekeepers know the sound of a queen bee piping.  (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Queen bee emerging. Beekeepers know the sound of a queen bee piping. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Queen bee emerging. Beekeepers know the sound of a queen bee piping. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Tuesday, December 25, 2012 at 7:55 AM

Honey Bee Royalty at State Fair

Queen bee, at the peak of her season, can lay about 2000 eggs a day. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

It's good to see that American Honey Bee Queen Teresa Bryson, 19, of Chambersburg, Pa., will be spreading the word about beekeeping and honey at the California State Fair, 1600 Exposition Blvd. Sacramento. The fair opened July 14 and continues through...

Queen bee, at the peak of her season, can lay about 2000 eggs a day. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Queen bee, at the peak of her season, can lay about 2000 eggs a day. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Queen bee, at the peak of her season, can lay about 2000 eggs a day. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Thursday, July 14, 2011 at 8:19 PM

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