Cooperative Extension San Joaquin County
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Cooperative Extension San Joaquin County

Posts Tagged: wasp

A New Wasp Species? EGSA's Winning T-Shirt

Stacey Rice of the Larry Godfrey lab, UC Davis Department of Entomology and Nematology, wearing the winning t-shirt she desinged. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

If you're trying to fuse art with science and want to draw a wasp on a penny-farthing, but the legs are too short to reach the pedals, there's only one thing to do: lengthen the legs! And create a "new species" of wasp in the process. A penny-farthing,...

Stacey Rice of the Larry Godfrey lab, UC Davis Department of Entomology and Nematology, wearing the winning t-shirt she desinged. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Stacey Rice of the Larry Godfrey lab, UC Davis Department of Entomology and Nematology, wearing the winning t-shirt she desinged. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Stacey Rice of the Larry Godfrey lab, UC Davis Department of Entomology and Nematology, wearing the winning t-shirt she designed. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Thursday, November 19, 2015 at 4:43 PM

What's It Like to Be Parasitized?

A wasp (family Aphidiinae) parasitizing an aphid. (Photo by Fran Keller, who received her doctorate in entomology this year from UC Davis.)

What's it like to be parasitized? Say you're a caterpillar or an aphid and a wasp comes along and lays her eggs inside you. Her eggs will hatch and then her offspring will eat their way out. You, the host,  are no more. Zero. Zip. Zilch. If you...

A wasp (family Aphidiinae) parasitizing an aphid. (Photo by Fran Keller, who received her doctorate in entomology this year from UC Davis.)
A wasp (family Aphidiinae) parasitizing an aphid. (Photo by Fran Keller, who received her doctorate in entomology this year from UC Davis.)

A wasp (family Aphidiinae) parasitizing an aphid. (Photo by Fran Keller, who received her doctorate in entomology this year from UC Davis.)

Posted on Wednesday, January 7, 2015 at 5:10 PM
Tags: Lynn Kimsey (253), parasitoid (1), Parasitoid Palooza (5), Robbin Thorp (232), Steve Heydon (39), Tabatha Yang (87), tachinid (1), wasp (5)

Green-Eyed Gal

Green-eyed wasp, genus Tachytes, in a nectarine tree. This one is a female, as identified by Lynn Kimsey, director of the Bohart Museum of Entomology.(Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

We saw her touch down in our nectarine tree last weekend. Big green compound eyes glowed at us. She moved up and down a branch, foraging for food, and then took off.  A wasp. The carnivore cousin of the vegetarian honey bee. They belong to the...

Green-eyed wasp, genus Tachytes, in a nectarine tree. This one is a female, as identified by Lynn Kimsey, director of the Bohart Museum of Entomology.(Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Green-eyed wasp, genus Tachytes, in a nectarine tree. This one is a female, as identified by Lynn Kimsey, director of the Bohart Museum of Entomology.(Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Green-eyed wasp, genus Tachytes, in a nectarine tree. This one is a female, as identified by Lynn Kimsey, director of the Bohart Museum of Entomology. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Green-eyed wasp, Tachytes sp., foraging on a nectarine tree. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Green-eyed wasp, Tachytes sp., foraging on a nectarine tree. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Green-eyed wasp, Tachytes sp., foraging on a nectarine tree. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A little somersault by a green-eyed wasp, genus Tachytes. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A little somersault by a green-eyed wasp, genus Tachytes. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A little somersault by a green-eyed wasp, genus Tachytes. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Monday, July 2, 2012 at 9:39 PM

Do You Brake for Wasps?

Solitary vespid foraging on Indian hawthorn at the Benicia marina. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Do you brake for wasps? We spotted a bumper sticker on the UC Davis campus the other day that read: "I brake for wasps." It was parked in the Briggs Hall loading zone--Briggs is the home of the UC Davis Department of Entomology--so I imagine it was...

Solitary vespid foraging on Indian hawthorn at the Benicia marina. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Solitary vespid foraging on Indian hawthorn at the Benicia marina. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Solitary vespid foraging ndian hawthorn at the Benicia marina. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Upside down, a solitary vespid checks out its surroundings. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Upside down, a solitary vespid checks out its surroundings. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Upside down, a solitary vespid checks out its surroundings. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

And away it goes. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
And away it goes. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

And away it goes. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Wednesday, May 25, 2011 at 9:29 PM

What's Bugging the Ladybug?

Ladybug

It probably bugs her but it doesn't kill her. But why? An entomologist at the University of Montreal is investigating why parasitic wasps (Dinocampus coccinellae) that lay their eggs on ladybugs (Coccinella maculata) do not kill them. Often a...

Ladybug
Ladybug

LADYBUG crawls on a leaf at the UC Berkeley Botanical Garden. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Close-up
Close-up

CLOSE-UP of a ladybug in Vacaville, Calif., eating aphids. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Searching for More Aphids
Searching for More Aphids

LADYBUG searching for more aphids. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Thursday, November 19, 2009 at 5:55 PM
 
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