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Posts Tagged: Eric Mussen

'The Sting' Revisited

The Sting: A bee stings the wrist of Extension apiculturist Eric Mussen. That's the abdominal tissue trailing. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Photographers are frustrated, and rightfully so, with all the thievery on the Internet. Like many other photos, "The Sting," is being used illegally for commercial purposes. It's appeared on sites like PhotoBucket where unscrupulous people sell it...

The Sting: A bee stings the wrist of Extension apiculturist Eric Mussen. That's the abdominal tissue trailing. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
The Sting: A bee stings the wrist of Extension apiculturist Eric Mussen. That's the abdominal tissue trailing. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The Sting: A bee stings the wrist of Extension apiculturist Eric Mussen. That's the abdominal tissue trailing. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

'The Sting' now has a life of its own and many are using it for their own commercial purposes: to profit from a photo that is not theirs.
'The Sting' now has a life of its own and many are using it for their own commercial purposes: to profit from a photo that is not theirs.

'The Sting' now has a life of its own and many are using it for their own commercial purposes: to profit from a photo that is not theirs.

Posted on Wednesday, August 26, 2015 at 7:32 PM
Tags: bee sting (8), copyrighted image (1), Eric Mussen (201), The Sting (3), The Sting (3), viral (1)

Why She's Packing Pollen That Way

A honey bee prepares to visit another primose. Note the stringy mass of pollen hanging from her hind legs. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

If you've ever seen honey bees foraging on primrose, you may have seen something unusual. What's with the pollen hanging below their hind legs as they buzz from primrose to primrose? There's a reason for that. Distinguished emeritus professor Robbin...

A honey bee prepares to visit another primose. Note the stringy mass of pollen hanging from her hind legs. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A honey bee prepares to visit another primose. Note the stringy mass of pollen hanging from her hind legs. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A honey bee prepares to visit another primose. Note the stringy mass of pollen hanging from her hind legs. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Honey bee rapidly covering the distance to the primrose. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Honey bee rapidly covering the distance to the primrose. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Honey bee rapidly covering the distance to the primrose. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Almost in! Honey bee partially enters a primrose blossom. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Almost in! Honey bee partially enters a primrose blossom. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Almost in! Honey bee partially enters a primrose blossom. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Honey bee foraging inside a primrose blossom. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Honey bee foraging inside a primrose blossom. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Honey bee foraging inside a primrose blossom. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Friday, August 21, 2015 at 6:02 PM

Ever Seen a Honey Bee Cleaning Her Tongue?

A honey bee cleaning her tongue. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

We humans brush our teeth, and we sometimes brush our tongues. But have you ever seen a honey bee cleaning her tongue? Bay Nature contributing editor Alison Hawks recently asked two of our UC Davis bee experts why bees clean themselves.  Their...

A honey bee cleaning her tongue. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A honey bee cleaning her tongue. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A honey bee cleaning her tongue. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Thursday, July 30, 2015 at 4:22 PM

A Spittin' Image

There's a spittlebug nympth inside this frothy material. This one is on lavender. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Talk about a spittin' image. When you see one spittlebug froth, you've seen them all, right? They all look alike, right? Well, the froth does, but you'll see different shapes and sizes on your plants. When Ria de Grassi, director of Federal Policy,...

There's a spittlebug nympth inside this frothy material. This one is on lavender. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
There's a spittlebug nympth inside this frothy material. This one is on lavender. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

There's a spittlebug nympth inside this frothy material. This one is on lavender. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

An adult spittlebug. (Photo by Jack Kelly Clark, courtesy of UC IPM)
An adult spittlebug. (Photo by Jack Kelly Clark, courtesy of UC IPM)

An adult spittlebug. (Photo by Jack Kelly Clark, courtesy of UC IPM)

Posted on Friday, July 17, 2015 at 5:35 PM
Tags: Eric Mussen (201), froth (1), nymph (1), spittlebug (1), UC IPM (2)

Keep Your 'Girls' Out of California Buckeye

A bee forages on California buckeye in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Beekeepers don't like their "girls" foraging in California buckeye (Aesculus californica) It's poisonous to bees. "The signs of poisoning can be as severe as dying adult bees and brood, only dying brood, brood that barely makes it and emerges...

A bee forages on California buckeye in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A bee forages on California buckeye in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A bee forages on California buckeye in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

California buckeye is poisonous to bees and can result in dying brood, or misshapen brood. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
California buckeye is poisonous to bees and can result in dying brood, or misshapen brood. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

California buckeye is poisonous to bees and can result in dying brood, or misshapen brood. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A California buckeye blooming on the UC Davis campus. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A California buckeye blooming on the UC Davis campus. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A California buckeye blooming on the UC Davis campus. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Wednesday, July 1, 2015 at 6:02 PM

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