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Cooperative Extension San Joaquin County
University of California
Cooperative Extension San Joaquin County

Posts Tagged: Harry H. Laidlaw Jr. Honey Bee Research Facility

Sold on the Salvia

A female Valley carpenter bee, Xylocopa varipuncta, forages on grape-scented sage, Salvia melissodora. Note the

Ever watched Valley carpenter bees (Xylocopa varipuncta) foraging on salvia? Native pollinator specialist Robbin Thorp, distinguished professor of entomology at the University of California, Davis, recently noticed a flurry of carpenter bees in the...

A female Valley carpenter bee, Xylocopa varipuncta, forages on grape-scented sage, Salvia melissodora. Note the
A female Valley carpenter bee, Xylocopa varipuncta, forages on grape-scented sage, Salvia melissodora. Note the "pollen cap." (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A female Valley carpenter bee, Xylocopa varipuncta, forages on grape-scented sage, Salvia melissodora. Note the "pollen cap." (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Check out the
Check out the "pollen cap" on this female Valley carpenter bee, Xylocopa varipuncta, foraging on grape-scented sage, Salvia melissodora. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Check out the "pollen cap" on this female Valley carpenter bee, Xylocopa varipuncta, foraging on grape-scented sage, Salvia melissodora. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Thursday, March 19, 2015 at 9:18 PM

Carpenter Bees Like Almond Blossoms, Too

A female Valley carpenter bee buzzes in the almond blossoms. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

We're accustomed to seeing honey bees pollinating the almonds. But carpenter bees do, too. We spotted a female Valley carpenter bee, Xylocopa varipuncta, foraging in an almond tree on Feb. 24 in a field adjacent to  the Harry H. Laidlaw...

A female Valley carpenter bee buzzes in the almond blossoms. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A female Valley carpenter bee buzzes in the almond blossoms. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A female Valley carpenter bee buzzes in the almond blossoms. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Full speed ahead: carpenter bee sights an almond blossom. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Full speed ahead: carpenter bee sights an almond blossom. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Full speed ahead: carpenter bee sights an almond blossom. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Female Valley carpenter bee meets almonds blossom. She's shaking her  thoracic muscles to loosen the pollen. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Female Valley carpenter bee meets almonds blossom. She's shaking her thoracic muscles to loosen the pollen. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Female Valley carpenter bee meets almonds blossom. She's shaking her thoracic muscles to loosen the pollen. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Thursday, February 27, 2014 at 10:16 PM

Can a Bee Unscrew the Sting?

Extension apiculturist Eric Mussen getting stung on the wrist. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

When a honey bee stings you, she makes the supreme sacrifice and dies.  She's usually defending her colony. In the process, she leaves behind part of her abdomen. A beekeeper simply scrapes the sting with a fingernail or a hive tool to stop the...

Extension apiculturist Eric Mussen getting stung on the wrist. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Extension apiculturist Eric Mussen getting stung on the wrist. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Extension apiculturist Eric Mussen getting stung on the wrist. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Monday, February 24, 2014 at 10:04 PM

The Lovely Ladies at the Laidlaw

The three queen bumble bees (Bombus melanopygus). (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

So far, so good. The three queen bumble bees (Bombus melanopygus) we found buzzing around our porch light the night of Jan. 9 are still very much alive. Who would have "thunk?" Native pollinator specialist Robbin Thorp, emeritus professor of...

The three queen bumble bees (Bombus melanopygus). (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
The three queen bumble bees (Bombus melanopygus). (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The three queen bumble bees (Bombus melanopygus). (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Bumble bee expert and UC Davis emeritus professor Robbin Thorp checks the trio. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Bumble bee expert and UC Davis emeritus professor Robbin Thorp checks the trio. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Bumble bee expert and UC Davis emeritus professor Robbin Thorp checks the trio. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Wednesday, January 15, 2014 at 10:00 PM

Why Keep Bees?

Brian Fishback shows his daughter, Emily, a bee observation hive. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Why become a beekeeper? Why keep bees? Beekeeper Brian Fishback of Wilton is quick to answer that. “Bees,” he says, “teach us core family values. Bees have to take care of each other and work together for the success of the colony,...

Brian Fishback shows his daughter, Emily, a bee observation hive. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Brian Fishback shows his daughter, Emily, a bee observation hive. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Brian Fishback shows his daughter, Emily, a bee observation hive. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The Fishbacks at the 2013 Dixon May Fair where they had just dropped off a bee observation hive: Brian, daughter Emily, now 3; daughter Jane, now 18 months, and wife Darla. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
The Fishbacks at the 2013 Dixon May Fair where they had just dropped off a bee observation hive: Brian, daughter Emily, now 3; daughter Jane, now 18 months, and wife Darla. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The Fishbacks at the 2013 Dixon May Fair where they had just dropped off a bee observation hive: Brian, daughter Emily, now 3; daughter Jane, now 18 months, and wife Darla. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Thursday, January 2, 2014 at 11:13 PM

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