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Cooperative Extension San Joaquin County
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Cooperative Extension San Joaquin County

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Meet Big Red, the Flameskimmer

A red flameskimmer, Libellula saturata, perches on a bamboo stake. Note the nesting earwigs and bees in the split stake. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Big Red visited us for four consecutive days. The red flameskimmer dragonfly, Libellula saturata, zigged and zagged into our pollinator garden in Vacaville, Calif. and perched on a bamboo stake for five hours at a time. Occasionally, he'd hunt--lift...

Posted on Tuesday, May 23, 2017 at 5:27 PM

She'll Speak on The World's Most Dangerous Animal

This is the yellow fever mosquito, Aedes aegptyi, which transmits dengue, Zika and other diseases. (CDC Photo)

The world's most dangerous animal isn't the shark, wolf, lion, elephant, hippo, crocodile, tsetse fly, tapeworm, assassin bug (kissing bug), freshwater snail, dog, snake or human. No, it's the mosquito. Infected mosquitoes transmit diseases that ...

Posted on Monday, May 22, 2017 at 4:37 PM

Have You Seen Me? Can You Identify Me?

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Have you seen me? Can you identify me? No, you're a skipper, but which one are you? The colorful brown skipper butterfly that touched down on our Jupiter's Beard in Vacaville, Calif., on May 17 puzzled us.  First skipper we've seen this year in...

Posted on Friday, May 19, 2017 at 5:58 PM

Bears Raiding Bee Colonies: They're Seeking the Brood

This is what bear damage to a hive looks like.  This photo was provided by Jackie Park-Burris of Palo Cedro, who owns Jackie Park-Burris Queens. (Photo courtesy of Jackie-Park Burris)

Yes, bears raid honey bee colonies. But it's primarily for the bee brood, not the honey. The brood provides the protein, and the honey, the  carbohydrates. For beekeepers and commercial queen bee breeders, this can wreak havoc. Financial...

Posted on Thursday, May 18, 2017 at 5:07 PM

A Face Only a Mother Could Love?

A golden dung fly, Scathophaga stercoraria, perched on lavender, stares at the photographer on Mother's Day. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

So there we were, on Mother's Day, looking at the yet-to-bloom English lavender in our yard. And there it was, something golden staring back at us. It was showing a face that "only a mother could love"--or an entomologist or an insect...

Posted on Wednesday, May 17, 2017 at 8:08 PM

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