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What's That Bug?

The championship Linnaean Team, Pacific Branch of the Entomological Society of America: (from left) Jéssica Gillung, Brendon Boudinot, and Ralph Washington Jr. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

It's exciting, entertaining and educational to watch the Entomological Society of America's Linnaean Games. Teams of graduate or undergraduate students challenge one another in a college bowl-like competition about entomological facts, trivia and noted...

The championship Linnaean Team, Pacific Branch of the Entomological Society of America: (from left) Jéssica Gillung, Brendon Boudinot, and Ralph Washington Jr. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
The championship Linnaean Team, Pacific Branch of the Entomological Society of America: (from left) Jéssica Gillung, Brendon Boudinot, and Ralph Washington Jr. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The championship Linnaean Team, Pacific Branch of the Entomological Society of America: (from left) Jéssica Gillung, Brendon Boudinot, and Ralph Washington Jr. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A Linnaean Games question asked of the UC Davis team: What caste of honey bee has the greatest number of ommatidia? The answer is the drone, the male honey bee. Ommatidia are the subunits of a compound eye. This photo shows a worker bee or female (left) and a drone (right). (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A Linnaean Games question asked of the UC Davis team: What caste of honey bee has the greatest number of ommatidia? The answer is the drone, the male honey bee. Ommatidia are the subunits of a compound eye. This photo shows a worker bee or female (left) and a drone (right). (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A Linnaean Games question asked of the UC Davis team: What caste of honey bee has the greatest number of ommatidia? The answer is the drone, the male honey bee. Ommatidia are the subunits of a compound eye. This photo shows a worker bee or female (left) and a drone (right). (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Friday, May 22, 2015 at 3:49 PM

'The Astonishing Ant Man' Jack Longino to Speak at UC Davis

A side view of the new ant species Eurhopalothrix zipacna that Jack Longino discovered in Central America. (Photo by Jack Longino)

John "Jack" Longino knows his ants. "We share the planet with millions of species, and many of them are insects," says Longino, professor and associate chair of biology at the University of Utah, Salt Lake City, and the adjunct curator of...

A side view of the new ant species Eurhopalothrix zipacna that Jack Longino discovered in Central America. (Photo by Jack Longino)
A side view of the new ant species Eurhopalothrix zipacna that Jack Longino discovered in Central America. (Photo by Jack Longino)

A side view of the new ant species Eurhopalothrix zipacna that Jack Longino discovered in Central America. (Photo by Jack Longino)

Posted on Thursday, May 21, 2015 at 2:28 PM
Tags: Alex Wild (13), ants (9), Jack Longino (1), Phil Ward (15), seminar (6), UC Davis (53), University of Utah (1)

Wasp Love!

A European paper wasp, Polistes dominula, foraging for food. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

"Wasp love." You don't hear those two words often, but you'll hear them often from Amy Toth, who's hoping that the hashtag, #wasplove, will draw attention to the wonderful world of wasps. Toth, known for her work on bee and wasp behavior,genomics, and...

A European paper wasp, Polistes dominula, foraging for food. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A European paper wasp, Polistes dominula, foraging for food. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A European paper wasp, Polistes dominula, foraging for food. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Close-up of a European paper wasp. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Close-up of a European paper wasp. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Close-up of a European paper wasp. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Amy Toth with a favorite wasp. (Photo courtesy of Iowa State University)
Amy Toth with a favorite wasp. (Photo courtesy of Iowa State University)

Amy Toth with a favorite wasp. (Photo courtesy of Iowa State University)

Posted on Wednesday, May 20, 2015 at 4:35 PM

The Wonderful World of Bugs

UC Davis entomology graduate student  Jéssica Gillung engages Griffin Shepherd, 7, of Winters, as she talks about a rose-haired tarantula. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Forget about “fun and games.” Think  “fun and names.” The open house at the Bohart Museum of Entomology at the University of California, Davis, last Sunday afternoon  focused on the theme, "Name That Bug! How About...

UC Davis entomology graduate student  Jéssica Gillung engages Griffin Shepherd, 7, of Winters, as she talks about a rose-haired tarantula. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
UC Davis entomology graduate student Jéssica Gillung engages Griffin Shepherd, 7, of Winters, as she talks about a rose-haired tarantula. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

UC Davis entomology graduate student Jéssica Gillung engages Griffin Shepherd, 7, of Winters, as she talks about a rose-haired tarantula. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Martin Hauser, senior insect biosystematist, California Department of Food and Agriculture, introduces Lucy Anderson, 9 of Davis to a walking stick. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Martin Hauser, senior insect biosystematist, California Department of Food and Agriculture, introduces Lucy Anderson, 9 of Davis to a walking stick. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Martin Hauser, senior insect biosystematist, California Department of Food and Agriculture, introduces Lucy Anderson, 9 of Davis to a walking stick. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Natasha Pineiro and Lucy and Liam Anderson, all of Davis, check out a display. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Natasha Pineiro and Lucy and Liam Anderson, all of Davis, check out a display. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Natasha Pineiro and Lucy and Liam Anderson, all of Davis, check out a display. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Griffin Shepherd, 7, and his sister, Savannah, 10, of Winters examine some of the specimen drawers. In the background is entomologist and Bohart Museum associate Jeff Smith talking to Alanna Vorous of Sacramento. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Griffin Shepherd, 7, and his sister, Savannah, 10, of Winters examine some of the specimen drawers. In the background is entomologist and Bohart Museum associate Jeff Smith talking to Alanna Vorous of Sacramento. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Griffin Shepherd, 7, and his sister, Savannah, 10, of Winters examine some of the specimen drawers. In the background is entomologist and Bohart Museum associate Jeff Smith talking to Alanna Vorous of Sacramento. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Tuesday, May 19, 2015 at 4:52 PM

Boy Wonder!

A male Valley carpenter bee engaging in nectar robber; he's drilling a hole in a foxglove to get the nectar, avoiding the pollination process. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

I've been waiting for a decade to see a male Valley carpenter bee (Xylocopa varipuncta) foraging in our family bee garden. The girls? Oh, yes. We see them every day. Sometimes half a dozen at a time. They're usually on the salvia or passionflower...

A male Valley carpenter bee engaging in nectar robber; he's drilling a hole in a foxglove to get the nectar, avoiding the pollination process. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A male Valley carpenter bee engaging in nectar robber; he's drilling a hole in a foxglove to get the nectar, avoiding the pollination process. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A male Valley carpenter bee engaging in nectar robber; he's drilling a hole in a foxglove to get the nectar, avoiding the pollination process. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Male valley carpenter bee foraging on dwarf bulbine. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Male valley carpenter bee foraging on dwarf bulbine. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Male valley carpenter bee foraging on dwarf bulbine. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Male Valley carpenter bee
Male Valley carpenter bee "cuddling" a blanket flower. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Male Valley carpenter bee "cuddling" a blanket flower. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Eyeing the photographer, a male Valley carpenter bee gets ready to leave a blanket flower. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Eyeing the photographer, a male Valley carpenter bee gets ready to leave a blanket flower. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Eyeing the photographer, a male Valley carpenter bee gets ready to leave a blanket flower. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A male Valley carpenter bee lifts off a foxglove. He was early chased by a territorial male European wool carder bee. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A male Valley carpenter bee lifts off a foxglove. He was early chased by a territorial male European wool carder bee. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A male Valley carpenter bee lifts off a foxglove. He was early chased by a territorial male European wool carder bee. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Monday, May 18, 2015 at 6:10 PM

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