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North American Meat Insitiute Releases MyMeatUp App for IPhones and Androids

The following came from the NAMI Lean Trimmings newsletter.

 

Meat Institute to Launch MyMeatUp App Tuesday.  The Meat Institute will nationally launch its new MyMeatUp app on Tuesday morning with a broad release to mainstream media outlets as well as college publications.  The release is part of a larger marketing strategy for the app over the next several months.  MyMeatUp is the first-of-its-kind mobile app aimed at helping consumers become more confident when buying meat and poultry.  The free app is the only available app with a full guide to beef, pork, lamb and veal retail meat cuts, and draws on content from www.MyMeatUp.org, a popular resource that was launched in 2016. 

 

Meat Institute staff and members have assisted in giving the app a solid rating prior to release. MyMeatUp currently has 29 five-star reviews in the Apple app store, which should help its searchability.  Members who have not downloaded the app are strongly encouraged to do so and provide positive reviews.  To download the iPhone version, click here.  The Android version is available here.

Posted on Monday, January 23, 2017 at 2:21 PM
Tags: Android (1), App (1), Beef (13), IPhone (1), Lamb (3), Meat (4), Meat Buying (1), Pork (1)

Small-scale farming and urban animal agriculture survey

The following comes from Dr. Alda Pires at UC Davis. Please consider participating in the survey.

Survey to identify the needs of small-scale farms and Urban animal agriculture Producers in the Western States of the US: livestock and poultry owners

The growing numbers of small-scale farms (SSFs) (1) and peri-urban and urban animal agriculture farms (UA) has increased the need for Extension specialists and veterinarians focused on small-scale and backyard livestock production(2).  We are seeking your help in this needs assessment regarding animal health concerns on small-scale farms and for peri-urban and urban animal agriculture in California, Colorado, Oregon, and Washington State. This study is led by Dr. Alda Pires (University of California), Dr. Dale Moore (Washington State University) and Dr. Ragan Adams (Colorado State University).

The increasing popularity of local food production and sustainability has put small-scale farming and urban animal agriculture at the forefront. Your input is very important in better understanding this food sector and would be greatly appreciated.

This survey aims to identify the needs of livestock and poultry owners related to animal health, animal husbandry and food safety; and the role that veterinarians play on small farms. This study will serve as a benchmark for designing effective educational programs to train farmers, backyard producers and veterinarians working within this sector.

Your participation is essential for this needs assessment. The survey will take about 15-20 minutes of your time. The survey can be accessed here:

http://ucanr.edu/survey/survey.cfm?surveynumber=15917

All your answers will remain completely confidential and no personal information about you will be recorded. You have the option to not participate and you can quit the survey at any time. This project is approved by the UC Davis, WA and CO University Institutional Review Boards.

We thank you for your time and your commitment to small-scale farming and urban animal agriculture.

Should you have any questions at any time, please feel free to contact me directly (Alda Pires at 530 754 9855, apires@ucdavis.edu).

 

Posted on Thursday, October 6, 2016 at 3:52 PM

UC Davis Horse Day October 22, 2016

The Annual UC Davis Horse Day is right around the corner! 

Be sure to register before October 7th to receive the discounted rate:

http://animalscience.ucdavis.edu/events/horse-day

 

If you have a group of 10 or more, please email Kathryn at knraley@ucdavis.edu for further information.

 

 

UCD Horse day2016
UCD Horse day2016

Posted on Tuesday, September 20, 2016 at 2:16 PM
Tags: Horses (2)

Coping with Drought on California Rangelands Publication

Announcement reprinted from California Wool Growers' Association newsletter. I was part of the team and it reflects input from Mendocino and Lake County ranchers as well as the rest of the state.

 

California has experienced five large-scale, multiyear droughts since 1960; however, the current event is considered the state's most severe drought in at least 500 years. Each year of the current drought has presented different challenges; for example, much of California received no measurable precipitation December 2013 through late January 2014. In the following year, the Sierra Nevada snowpack was just 5% of normal. As California ranching is largely dependent on rain-fed systems, as opposed to groundwater or stored water, it is very vulnerable to drought. In fact, rangeland livestock ranchers were among the first affected by the abnormally warm, dry winters at the beginning of the current multiyear drought.

 

In this article, we highlight lessons learned so far from past droughts, as well as California's unprecedented and ongoing multiyear drought. We draw on ranchers' perspectives and experiences, including research results from a statewide mail survey of 507 ranchers and semistructured interviews of 102 ranchers, as well as our own experiences. The mail survey (the California Rangeland Decision-Making Survey) included questions on operator and operation demographics, goals and practices, information resources, and rancher perspectives. Semistructured interviews are part of a larger ongoing project (the California Ranch Stewardship Project) examining rangeland management for multiple ecosystem services.

 

The publication is available at the following link - http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S019005281630027X

 

 

Posted on Friday, September 16, 2016 at 2:59 PM
Tags: 5-year drought (1), cattle (9), drought (2), drought strategies (1), goats (12), rangeland (10), sheep (18)

New USDA App Protects Cattle from Heat Stress

The following is a repost from ASAS Taking Stock.

 
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By Jan Suszkiw, Agricultural Research Service, USDA

USDA's Agricultural Research Service (ARS) has launched a new smartphone application (“app”) that forecasts conditions triggering heat stress in cattle. The app is available at both Google Play and the App Store.

Compatible with Android and Apple mobile phone, the app issues forecasts one to seven days in advance of extreme heat conditions, along with recommended actions that can protect animals before and during a heat-stress event.

In some cattle, distress and discomfort from prolonged exposure to extreme heat cause diminished appetite, reduced growth or weight gain, greater susceptibility to disease and, in some cases, even death. Cattle housed in confined feedlot pens are especially vulnerable to heat-stress events, notes Tami Brown-Brandl, an ARS agricultural engineer at the Roman L. Hruska U.S. Meat Animal Research Center (USMARC) in Clay Center, Nebraska.

In addition to high temperatures, weather-related factors like humidity, wind speed, and solar radiation can contribute to heat stress, adds Brown-Brandl.

Until the early 1990s, the National Weather Service (NWS) issued livestock safety warnings that helped feedlot producers preempt losses or diminished productivity resulting from heat-stress events. Starting in the mid-2000s, USMARC researchers filled the void with a Web page, which is still available today, offering similar forecasts.

Recent increases in smartphone usage prompted ARS to design and launch a mobile-app that allows producers to access forecasts while they're in the field.

The resulting “Heat Stress” app, which was beta-tested last year, is based on several years of field research conducted by Brown-Brandl, fellow ag engineer Roger Eigenberg and others at USMARC—including Randy Bradley. Bradley, an information technology specialist, is responsible for a color-coded heat-index map of the entire continental United States.

In addition to feedlot producers, animal caretakers and extension personnel, the Heat Stress app may also prove useful to professors, students and others with an interest in livestock welfare. The app has been added to Federal Mobile Apps Registry.

A list of ARS Mobile Apps can be found on the ARS Web page under “Quick Links.”

ARS is USDA's principal intramural scientific research agency.

 

SCIENTIST CONTACT

Tami Brown-Brandl, Roman L. Hruska U.S. Meat Animal Research Center, Clay Center, Nebr., (402) 762-4279(402) 762-4279,tami.brownbrandl@ars.usda.gov.

 

For further reading:

Temperament Plays Key Role in Cattle Health

http://www.ars.usda.gov/is/pr/2013/130225.htm

 

Keeping Cattle Cool and Stress-Free Is Goal of ARS Study

http://www.ars.usda.gov/is/pr/2010/100325.htm

 

Posted on Thursday, September 1, 2016 at 1:38 PM
Tags: Cattle (9), heat stress (1), Smartphone Apps (2)

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