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Tiger by the Tail

Western Tiger Swallowtail

Talk about a tiger by the tail. That would be the Western Tiger Swallowtail (Papilio rutulus). It's returned to the Davis area after a 15-year hiatus. Butterfly expert Arthur Shapiro, professor of evolution and ecology at the University of...

Western Tiger Swallowtail
Western Tiger Swallowtail

THIS IMAGE of the Western Tiger Swallowtail is by naturalist/photographer Greg Kareofelas, who took this in east Davis last week. Butterfly experts hadn't seen this butterfly in the Davis area for 15 years until this year.

Arthur Shapiro
Arthur Shapiro

BUTTERFLY EXPERT Arthur Shapiro hadn't seen the Western Tiger Swallowtail in the Davis area for 15 years. This year there's been some 100 sightings. "Now it looks like it's back as if nothing had happened!" he said. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Friday, August 14, 2009 at 7:06 PM

The Bees Have It

Signature Sign

The bees have it. That would be honey bees and native bees. The UC Davis Department of Entomology has just launched its new bee biology Web site. It's a place to learn about research, outreach, publications and upcoming courses; read the news stories,...

Signature Sign
Signature Sign

SIGN in front of the Harry H. Laidlaw Jr. Honey Bee Research Facility at UC Davis honors the legendary geneticist. The ceramic sculpture at the site (sign and walls) is the work of Davis artist Donna Billick and entomologist-artist Diane Ullman. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Working the Bees
Working the Bees

GENETICIST Harry H. Laidlaw Jr. (1907-2003) tends his hives. He served as a member of the UC Davis Department of Entomology faculty from 1947 to 1974. He published his last scientific paper at age 87 and his last book at 90.

Posted on Thursday, August 13, 2009 at 6:39 PM

The Buzz About CCD

Plight of the Honey Bee

Entomologists, geneticists and virologists are still searching for the cause of colony collapse disorder (CCD). Yes, they're still searching, and no, there' s no known cause yet. CCD is a mysterious phenomonen characterized by adult bees abandoning the...

Plight of the Honey Bee
Plight of the Honey Bee

EXTENSION APICULTURIST Eric Mussen (left) of the UC Davis Department of Entomology faculty shares information with Pennsylvania State Uniersity entomologist Dennis van Engelsdorp at the 2007 meeting of the Entomological Society of America. UC Davis and Penn State receive research funds in a project launched by Haagen-Dazs. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Jeff Pettis
Jeff Pettis

ENTOMOLOGIST Jeff Pettis talks about the plight of the honey bees at the Entomological Society of America's annual meeting in 2007. Pettis is with the USDA's Agricultural Research Service (ARS) Bee Research Laboratory in Beltsville, Md. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Wednesday, August 12, 2009 at 6:38 PM

In the Pink

Carpenter Bee

Thunder boomed across the garden.The carpenter bee (Xylocopata tabaniformis orpifex) meant business.She headed straight for the slowly opening rock purslane  (Calandrinia grandiflora). Never mind that the petals hadn't quite unfolded. Tackling the tiny...

Carpenter Bee
Carpenter Bee

CARPENTER BEE nectars a rock purslane. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Pollen-Covered Carpenter Bee
Pollen-Covered Carpenter Bee

POLLEN-COVERED carpenter bee takes ownership of a rock purslane. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Tuesday, August 11, 2009 at 5:32 PM

'Mint' Condition

Honey Bee

Honey bees love catmint as much as cats love catnip. Fact is, catmint and catnip belong to the same family: the mint family or Lamiaceae. The family also includes such aromatic celebrities as peppermint, sage, thyme, lavender, basil and oregano. So,...

Honey Bee
Honey Bee

HONEY BEE, with tongue extended, heads for catmint (Nepeta faassenii). This will be among the plants in the half-acre Häagen-Dazs Honey Bee Haven, to be open to the public Oct. 16 on Bee Biology Road, UC Davis. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Nectaring
Nectaring

WITH POLLEN crowning her head, a honey bee nectars catmint. It's a bee favorite and a people favorite.(Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Monday, August 10, 2009 at 5:10 PM

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