Cooperative Extension San Joaquin County
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Cooperative Extension San Joaquin County

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Itsy Bitsy Spider

Yes, we can see you. A crab spider on Mexican sunflower (Tithonia). (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The itsy bitsy spider climbed up the water spout. Down came the rain and washed the spider out. Out came the sun and dried up all the rain and the itsy bitsy spider climbed up the spout again.--Nursery Rhyme It was an itsy bitsy spider. But it wasn't...

Posted on Thursday, August 9, 2018 at 5:00 PM
Focus Area Tags: Environment Yard & Garden

Portrait of My Old Flame

A flame skimmer dragonfly (Libellula saturata) perches on a bamboo stake in a Vacaville pollinator garden. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Just call it "my old flame." Well, it's not mine, but it is a flame of sorts, a flame skimmer dragonfly (Libellula saturata) and it's firecracker red. We see this species frequenting our pollinator garden in Vacaville, which includes a fish pond,...

Posted on Wednesday, August 8, 2018 at 5:00 PM
Focus Area Tags: Yard & Garden

Bee-Hold, The Eye of the Bee-Holder

Bee-hold, the eye of a bee-holder. When you have a "Bee Crossing" sign in your pollinator garden, odds are that bees will cross right in front of that sign. And it's not always a honey bee. European wool carder bees (Anthidium manicatum) zip around...

Posted on Tuesday, August 7, 2018 at 5:32 PM
Focus Area Tags: Agriculture Food Yard & Garden

Ever Seen a Gulf Fritillary Laying an Egg?

Gulf Fritillary Agraulis vanillae), an orangish-reddish butterfly of the family Nymphalidae, lays its eggs on its host plant, Passiflora. They often lay their eggs on the tendrils. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Ever seen a Gulf Fritillary butterfly laying an egg? The Gulf Frit (Agraulis vanillae), an orangish-reddish butterfly of the family Nymphalidae, lays its eggs on its host plant,  Passiflora. When you see its silver-spangled underwings, you...

Posted on Monday, August 6, 2018 at 5:00 PM
Focus Area Tags: Environment Natural Resources

Up Close and Personal with a Yellow-Faced Bumble Bee

A yellow-faced bumble bee, Bombus vosnesenskii, foraging on a Mexican sunflower (Tithonia) in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Sometimes they barely notice you. Such was the case of a yellow-faced bumble bee, Bombus vosnesenskii, spotted on our Mexican sunflower (Tithonia). If a picture is worth a thousand words, what is a bee worth? Priceless. If you want to learn more...

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