Cooperative Extension San Joaquin County
University of California
Cooperative Extension San Joaquin County

Posts Tagged: pollination

Waiting for the Bees

A queen black-tailed bumble bee, Bombus melanopygus, foraging on pansies on Jan. 22, 2014. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Where, oh where, is that first bumble bee of the year? It's about this time of the year when the queen black-tailed bumble bee, Bombus melanopygus, and the queen yellow-faced bumble bee, Bombus vosnesenskii, emerge.  One of our area readers asked...

A queen black-tailed bumble bee, Bombus melanopygus, foraging on pansies on Jan. 22, 2014. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A queen black-tailed bumble bee, Bombus melanopygus, foraging on pansies on Jan. 22, 2014. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A queen black-tailed bumble bee, Bombus melanopygus, foraging on pansies on Jan. 22, 2014. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Yellow-faced bumble bee, Bombus vosnesenskii, on rock purslane. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Yellow-faced bumble bee, Bombus vosnesenskii, on rock purslane. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Yellow-faced bumble bee, Bombus vosnesenskii, on rock purslane. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Thursday, January 22, 2015 at 9:19 PM

Protecting the Pollinators

Assistant professor Neal Williams and Kimiora Ward, research associate from the Williams lab, collect bees.  (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

It's good to see so many publications focusing on the pollinator crisis--because that's exactly what it is, a crisis. Writing for the Nature journal, Sharon Levy recently examined pollination studies that focus on the importance of pollinators and the...

Assistant professor Neal Williams and Kimiora Ward, research associate from the Williams lab, collect bees.  (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Assistant professor Neal Williams and Kimiora Ward, research associate from the Williams lab, collect bees. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Assistant professor Neal Williams and Kimiora Ward, research associate from the Williams lab, collect bees. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Neal Williams (right) and colleague Rufus Isaacs confer at the Entomological Society of America meeting Wednesday, Nov. 16 in Reno. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Neal Williams (right) and colleague Rufus Isaacs confer at the Entomological Society of America meeting Wednesday, Nov. 16 in Reno. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Neal Williams (right) and colleague Rufus Isaacs co confer at the Entomological Society of America meeting Wednesday, Nov. 16 in Reno. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Thursday, November 17, 2011 at 9:47 PM

Queen of the Crops

Find Waldo

We often hear of "cream of the crop," but the honey bee is  the "queen of the crops." Honey bees are crucial to California’s $32 billion agriculture industry. They  pollinate more than 90...

Find Waldo
Find Waldo

A pollen-packed honey bee curls up in a pomegranate blossom. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Tuesday, October 7, 2008 at 5:04 PM
Tags: Eric Mussen (245), honey bee (196), major crops (1), pollination (10), pomegranate (6)

What Price Pollination?

Silver wings

What are insect pollinators worth to the global economy? Well, it's a lot less than the Wall Street bailout...er...rescue plan. Recent research published in the journal Ecological Economics  reveals just how important insect...

Silver wings
Silver wings

The honey bee, resplendent here with silvery wings, is gold to the global economy. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Bee on almond blossom
Bee on almond blossom

A honey bee visits an almond blossom. California's 700,000 acres of almonds require two hives per acre for pollination. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Wednesday, October 1, 2008 at 11:43 AM
Tags: almonds (21), economy (1), honey bee (196), pollination (10), price of pollination (1)

Getting the Red In

Bee pollinating a pomegranate

If you love pomegranates, you can thank a honey bee. If you love capturing images of pomegranates, you can thank a honey bee. And, if you love juicing them and making pomegranate jelly—as I do—you can thank a honey bee. The honey...

Bee pollinating a pomegranate
Bee pollinating a pomegranate

A honey bee pollinates a pomegranate blossom on May 26, 2008. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Split personality
Split personality

Four months after the pomegranate tree blossomed, this is the result: crimson jewels. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Friday, September 26, 2008 at 6:04 PM
Tags: honey bees (346), pollination (10), pomegranates (5)

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