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Bee Swarm at Briggs

Bee Swarm

Eagle-eyed Carol Nickles saw it first. The graduate student coordinator for the UC Davis Department of Entomology spotted the bee swarm from a third-floor window of Briggs Hall. There it was, swaying on a tree branch, about 25 feet above the...

Bee Swarm
Bee Swarm

BEE SWARM on a limb near Briggs Hall, home of the UC Davis Department of Entomology. This telephoto was taken from the third floor of Briggs. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Bee Tree
Bee Tree

BEE TREE at Briggs. To the left of the lettering, "Swarm," is the pencil-shaped bee swarm. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Monday, July 13, 2009 at 6:36 PM

Just Bee-Cause

Honey Bee

Sometimes you don't think about the declining bee population when you see a pollen-dusted honey bee rolling around in a poppy blossom, but colony collapse disorder (CCD) is still with us. Pollinator protection is a must. That's why we were glad to see...

Honey Bee
Honey Bee

A HONEY BEE rolls around in a poppy, the California state flower.(Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Up Close
Up Close

POLLEN-PACKING honey bee nectars a poppy. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Friday, July 10, 2009 at 6:34 PM

These 'Leaves' Are Made for Walking

Camouflaged

Two newly moulted insects in the Bohart Museum of Entomology at the University  of California, Davis, look just like leaves.  But these “leaves” are made for walking. These are camouflaged insects (Phyllium giganteum), commonly known as "walking...

Camouflaged
Camouflaged

FIND THE INSECT. Yes, there's an insect in this photo. Under the top blackberry leaf is a "walking leaf" (lighter green). Walking leaves are a big attraction at the Bohart Museum of Entomology. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Walking Leaf
Walking Leaf

STEVE HEYDON, senior museum scientist at the Bohart Museum of Entomology, checks out a walking leaf, Phyllium giganteum, a native of Malaysia. The camouflaged insect looks like an autumn leaf turning colors. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Thursday, July 9, 2009 at 5:11 PM

A Salute to California Agriculture

California Agriculture

Do you recognize the native bee that graces the cover of the current edition of California Agriculture, a peer-reviewed journal published by the UC Division of...

California Agriculture
California Agriculture

A CARPENTER BEE graces the cover of the current edition of California Agriculture. This spectacular photo is the work of Rollin Coville. See the California Agriculture journal online at http://californiaagriculture.ucanr.org/.

Posted on Wednesday, July 8, 2009 at 6:17 PM

Marvelous Mirids

Pretty in pink

So, you spot a bug crawling up and down a plant in your garden. What is it? Plant bug. Plant bug? No kidding. The common name for certain members of the Miridae family is--you guessed it--"plant bug." Entomologist Lynn Kimsey, who directs...

Pretty in pink
Pretty in pink

PINK BLOSSOMS of this cactus, Echinopsis, rise majestically, but if you look closely, this plant has company. It harbors plant bugs (see photos below). (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Going Up
Going Up

PLANT BUG, from the family Miradae, scurries up a pink cactus, Echinopsis. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Going Down
Going Down

WHAT GOES UP must come down. A plant bug (family Miridae) heads downward on a pink cactus, Echinopsis. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Tuesday, July 7, 2009 at 5:45 PM
Tags: Echinopsis (1), Lynn Kimsey (237), Miridae (1), mirids (1), pink cactus (1), plant bugs (1)

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