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Saving the Bees, One Shirt at a Time

Saving the Bees

Officials at the UC Davis Department of Entomology and the Bohart Museum of Entomology are saving the bees--one T-shirt at a time. Fran Keller, a doctoral candidate in entomology, and Nanase Nakanishi, a senior animal science major, teamed to create a...

Saving the Bees
Saving the Bees

SPORTING the new honey bee t-shirts they created to raise funds for honey bee research at UC Davis are Nanase Nakanishi (left), an animal science major and a student employee at the Bohart Museum of Entomology, and Fran Keller, a doctoral student in entomology. Nanase models the front, and Fran, the back. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Close-Up
Close-Up

BACK of the new honey bee t-shirt features a newly emerged bee tucked inside a line drawing of a hive. Proceeds benefit honey bee research at UC Davis. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Friday, October 23, 2009 at 6:28 PM

Cutting It

Noctuid Cutworm

The dull brown moth may be dull-looking but as noctuid cutworms they're not. We spotted this noctuid cutworm, soon to be a dull brown moth, last week on a yarrow in the Storer Gardens at the University of California, Davis. Noctuids belong to--guess...

Noctuid Cutworm
Noctuid Cutworm

NOCTUID CUTWORM, soon to be a dull brown moth, crawls on a yarrow at the Storer Garden, UC Davis. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Thursday, October 22, 2009 at 6:32 PM

Bee-lieve!

Newly emerged bee

Dianne DiBlasi did it. Back in January, we wrote a Bug Squad blog about Dianne DiBlasi’s three-year effort to overturn an Allendale, N.J. ban on backyard beekeeping. DiBlasi, who leads a group of teen environmentalists known as Team B.E.E.S. (Bergen...

Newly emerged bee
Newly emerged bee

NEWLY EMERGED BEE at the Harry H. Laidlaw Jr. Honey Bee Research Facility, UC Davis. Bees like this are now welcome in Allendale, N.J., thanks to the successful efforts of beekeeper Dianne DiBlasi to lift a ban on backyard beekeeping. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Wednesday, October 21, 2009 at 7:50 PM

A Tongue for Explosives, Narcotics

The Tongue Has It

Honey bees are involved in a unique "sting operation" utilizing their sense of keen smell to detect explosives and narcotics. And now a scientist from the Los Alamos National Laboratory, New Mexico, will talk about the project on Wednesday, Oct. 21 on...

The Tongue Has It
The Tongue Has It

HONEY BEE nectaring lavender. Los Alamos National Laboratory has developed a method for training the common honey bee to detect the explosives used in bombs. The method involves the tongue or proboscis. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Tuesday, October 20, 2009 at 6:30 PM

The Drone: Target of Attacks

Drone and worker bee

Drones--remotely piloted aircraft used in reconnaissance and target attacks--are in the news, but so are the other drones--male bees.This time of year drones are as scarce as the proverbial hen's teeth. They're not needed in the hive now--just extra...

Drone and worker bee
Drone and worker bee

NEWLY EMERGED: a drone (male bee) is the foreground. In the background is a worker bee (infertile female). They're one day old in this photo. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Big Eyes, Bulky Body
Big Eyes, Bulky Body

DRONES are easy to spot in the hive by their big eyes and bulky body. This drone is one day old. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Close-Up
Close-Up

CLOSE-UP of the back of a drone head. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Monday, October 19, 2009 at 6:36 PM

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