Cooperative Extension San Joaquin County
University of California
Cooperative Extension San Joaquin County

Posts Tagged: Tithonia

It Suits Them to a 'T'

Gulf Fritillary (Agraulis vanillae) on Tithonia. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

It suits them to a "T." And the "T" is for Tithonia. Many species of butterflies frequent our Tithonia, also known as Mexican sunflower. Like its name implies, it's a member of the sunflower family, Asteraceae. On any given Sunday--not to...

Gulf Fritillary (Agraulis vanillae) on Tithonia. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Gulf Fritillary (Agraulis vanillae) on Tithonia. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Gulf Fritillary (Agraulis vanillae) on Tithonia. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Anise Swallowtail (Papilio zelicaon) on Tithonia. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Anise Swallowtail (Papilio zelicaon) on Tithonia. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Anise Swallowtail (Papilio zelicaon) on Tithonia. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Monarch (Danaus plexippus) on Tithonia. (PHoto by Kathy Keatley Garvey
Monarch (Danaus plexippus) on Tithonia. (PHoto by Kathy Keatley Garvey

Monarch (Danaus plexippus) on Tithonia. (PHoto by Kathy Keatley Garvey

A skipper (family Hesperiidae) on Tithonia. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A skipper (family Hesperiidae) on Tithonia. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A skipper (family Hesperiidae) on Tithonia. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Wednesday, July 29, 2015 at 9:04 PM

Assume the Position!

An immature praying mantis assumes the position. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Take one Mexican sunflower (Tithonia). Add daylight. Add one praying mantis. Add patience, persistence and perseverance. And you have a recipe for success or failure. In this case, an immature praying mantis patiently perched on a...

An immature praying mantis assumes the position. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
An immature praying mantis assumes the position. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

An immature praying mantis assumes the position. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Let's try it this way. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Let's try it this way. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Let's try it this way. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

No, this way might be better. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
No, this way might be better. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

No, this way might be better. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Let's call it a day. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Let's call it a day. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Let's call it a day. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Tuesday, July 14, 2015 at 9:10 PM

Karate Kick!

Two sunflower bees battle it out: a male Svastra (larger bee) delivers a quick kick to a smaller male Melissodes. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Boys will be boys! Especially on a Mexican sunflower (Tithonia). It's a favorite of Melissodes and Svastra sunflower bees. The males get downright defensive and aggressive when it comes to protecting their turf and seeking the...

Two sunflower bees battle it out: a male Svastra (larger bee) delivers a quick kick to a smaller male Melissodes. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Two sunflower bees battle it out: a male Svastra (larger bee) delivers a quick kick to a smaller male Melissodes. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Two sunflower bees battle it out: a male Svastra (larger bee) delivers a quick kick to a smaller male Melissodes. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The male Melissodes (right) goes sprawling after a swift kick by a male Svastra. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
The male Melissodes (right) goes sprawling after a swift kick by a male Svastra. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The male Melissodes (right) goes sprawling after a swift kick by a male Svastra. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Wednesday, July 8, 2015 at 7:04 PM
Tags: Melissodes (2), Mexican sunflower (37), Svastra (1), Tithonia (49)

Snuggle Bugs

Male sunflower bees, Melissodes robustior, as identified by Robbin Thorp, distinguished emeritus professor of entomology at UC Davis, slumber away on a Mexican sunflower, Tithonia. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Just call them "snuggle bugs." Or "snuggle bees." After spending the day chasing the girls and defending their  patch of Mexican sunflowers or Tithonia, a cluster of  Melissodes robustior males settled down for the night. Their bed...

Male sunflower bees, Melissodes robustior, as identified by Robbin Thorp, distinguished emeritus professor of entomology at UC Davis, slumber away on a Mexican sunflower, Tithonia. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Male sunflower bees, Melissodes robustior, as identified by Robbin Thorp, distinguished emeritus professor of entomology at UC Davis, slumber away on a Mexican sunflower, Tithonia. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Male sunflower bees, Melissodes robustior, as identified by Robbin Thorp, distinguished emeritus professor of entomology at UC Davis, slumber away on a Mexican sunflower, Tithonia. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Monday, July 6, 2015 at 4:35 PM

A Fly Is a Fly Is a Fly

Drone fly, Eristalis tenax, sipping nectar from a Mexican sunflower, Tithonia. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A bee is a bee is a bee is a bee. 'Cept when it's a fly. Lately we've been seeing lots of images on social media (including Facebook and Twitter), news media websites, and stock photo sites of "honey bees."  But they're actually...

Drone fly, Eristalis tenax, sipping nectar from a Mexican sunflower, Tithonia. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Drone fly, Eristalis tenax, sipping nectar from a Mexican sunflower, Tithonia. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Drone fly, Eristalis tenax, sipping nectar from a Mexican sunflower, Tithonia. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The
The "H" is easily seen on the drone fly. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The "H" is easily seen on the drone fly. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Drone fly heads for another blossom. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Drone fly heads for another blossom. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Drone fly heads for another blossom. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Monday, October 20, 2014 at 9:03 PM

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