Cooperative Extension San Joaquin County
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Cooperative Extension San Joaquin County

Posts Tagged: ladybugs

Insect Wedding Photography in a Rose Garden

Love in the rose garden. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

"I do! I do! I do!" Some of us engage in wedding photography. Not with humans. With insects. All you need is a bride, a groom and a…hmm…bedroom. That could be a leafy green bedroom in the rose garden where the lady beetles, aka ladybugs,...

Love in the rose garden. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Love in the rose garden. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Love in the rose garden. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Bridal couple heads for some privacy. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Bridal couple heads for some privacy. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Bridal couple heads for some privacy. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Don't let a thorn get in your way. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Don't let a thorn get in your way. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Don't let a thorn get in your way. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The view is better over here. I think I see an aphid. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
The view is better over here. I think I see an aphid. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The view is better over here. I think I see an aphid. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Just need a pillow of rose petals for the night. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey. All images taken with a Nikon D800 and a macro lens, 105mm)
Just need a pillow of rose petals for the night. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey. All images taken with a Nikon D800 and a macro lens, 105mm)

Just need a pillow of rose petals for the night. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey. All images taken with a Nikon D800 and a macro lens, 105mm)

Posted on Tuesday, April 18, 2017 at 5:15 PM

Can Lady Beetle Larvae Eat Aphids?

Close-up of a lady beetle larva eating an aphid. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Can the larvae of lady beetles (aka ladybugs) eat aphids? Yes, they can.  And yes, they do. We spotted some lady beetle larvae on our yellow roses today and guess what they were doing? Right, eating aphids. Eating lots of aphids. The larvae look...

Close-up of a lady beetle larva eating an aphid. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Close-up of a lady beetle larva eating an aphid. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Close-up of a lady beetle larva eating an aphid. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

From a distance, you can see the ladybug larva and a lot of aphids on this yellow rose. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
From a distance, you can see the ladybug larva and a lot of aphids on this yellow rose. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

From a distance, you can see the ladybug larva and a lot of aphids on this yellow rose. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A multicolored Asian lady beetle prowls a yellow rose bush in search of aphids. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A multicolored Asian lady beetle prowls a yellow rose bush in search of aphids. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A multicolored Asian lady beetle prowls a yellow rose bush in search of aphids. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The lady beetle lays her tiny eggs in clusters beneath a leaf. These are probably the eggs of a multicolored Asian lady beetle. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
The lady beetle lays her tiny eggs in clusters beneath a leaf. These are probably the eggs of a multicolored Asian lady beetle. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The lady beetle lays her tiny eggs in clusters beneath a leaf. These are probably the eggs of a multicolored Asian lady beetle. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

There's Gold on Them Thar Roses

Matched pair: Two multicolored Asian beetles on rose leaves in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

There's gold on them thar roses. No, not the kind of gold found during the California Gold Rush (1848–1855) that brought some 300,000 folks to the Golden State. These are gold eggs from the multicolored Asian beetle, Harmonia axyridis, that...

Matched pair: Two multicolored Asian beetles on rose leaves in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Matched pair: Two multicolored Asian beetles on rose leaves in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Matched pair: Two multicolored Asian beetles on rose leaves in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The lady beetles lay their eggs in a cluster or row. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
The lady beetles lay their eggs in a cluster or row. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The lady beetles lay their eggs in a cluster or row. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Close-up of lady beetle eggs. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Close-up of lady beetle eggs. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Close-up of lady beetle eggs. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Friday, March 24, 2017 at 4:28 PM

Aphids--It's What's for Dinner!

A multicolored Asian lady beetle, Harmonia axyridis, chows down on an aphid while other aphids suck juices from the rosebud. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

"Well, yes, I would like some aphids for dinner," said every lady beetle (aka ladybug) everywhere. With the lush green growth of spring, come aphids (the prey) and lady beetles (the predators). And now, if you look closely, you'll see clusters or rows...

A multicolored Asian lady beetle, Harmonia axyridis, chows down on an aphid while other aphids suck juices from the rosebud. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A multicolored Asian lady beetle, Harmonia axyridis, chows down on an aphid while other aphids suck juices from the rosebud. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A multicolored Asian lady beetle, Harmonia axyridis, chows down on an aphid while other aphids suck juices from the rosebud. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A multicolored Asian lady beetle on a rain-soaked rose leaf on the first day of spring, March 20, in Vacaville, Calif. Note the aphids below the beetle. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A multicolored Asian lady beetle on a rain-soaked rose leaf on the first day of spring, March 20, in Vacaville, Calif. Note the aphids below the beetle. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A multicolored Asian lady beetle on a rain-soaked rose leaf on the first day of spring, March 20, in Vacaville, Calif. Note the aphids below the beetle. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Rain-soaked lady beetle eggs on the first day of spring, March 20, in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Rain-soaked lady beetle eggs on the first day of spring, March 20, in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Rain-soaked lady beetle eggs on the first day of spring, March 20, in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Monday, March 20, 2017 at 4:55 PM

Aphids? Bring on the Beetle Mania!

Dorsal view of a multicolored Asian lady beetle on a rose bush. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

They're back! Have you checked your rose bushes lately? Along with the lush new growth, you'll probably notice a new crop of aphids. And if you look closely, probably lady beetles (aka ladybugs). The UC Integrated Pest Management Program (UC IPM)...

Dorsal view of a multicolored Asian lady beetle on a rose bush. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Dorsal view of a multicolored Asian lady beetle on a rose bush. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Dorsal view of a multicolored Asian lady beetle on a rose bush. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A lady beetle gobbling an aphid. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A lady beetle gobbling an aphid. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A lady beetle gobbling an aphid. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Peek-a-boo! A lady beetle peers between a folded rose leaf. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Peek-a-boo! A lady beetle peers between a folded rose leaf. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Peek-a-boo! A lady beetle peers between a folded rose leaf. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Lady beetles, where are you? Here's dinner!  Aphids use their long slender mouthparts to pierce plant parts and suck the juices. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Lady beetles, where are you? Here's dinner! Aphids use their long slender mouthparts to pierce plant parts and suck the juices. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Lady beetles, where are you? Here's dinner! Aphids use their long slender mouthparts to pierce plant parts and suck the juices. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Thursday, March 9, 2017 at 4:53 PM

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