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Posts Tagged: James Carey

ICE Is Red-Hot!

Worker bes cleaning out queen cells. Honey bee presentations will be part of the ICE program. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

You've heard folks say "cold as ice," right? Well, ICE is red hot. The International Congress of Entomology (ICE) is gearing up for its 2016 conference, "Entomology without Borders," to take place Sept. 25-30, 2016 in Orlando, Fla., and the line-up of...

Worker bes cleaning out queen cells. Honey bee presentations will be part of the ICE program. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Worker bes cleaning out queen cells. Honey bee presentations will be part of the ICE program. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Worker bes cleaning out queen cells. Honey bee presentations will be part of the ICE program. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Monday, November 17, 2014 at 5:33 PM

How Honey Bees Make Collective Decisions

Brian Johnson in front of his bee observation hive. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Like to know more about honey bees make collective decisions?Mark your calendar to attend a seminar this week at the University of California, Davis. Brian Johnson, assistant professor at the UC Davis Department of Entomology, will speak on "Organization...

Brian Johnson in front of his bee observation hive. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Brian Johnson in front of his bee observation hive. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Brian Johnson in front of his bee observation hive. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Brian Johnson checks out a frame at the Harry H. Laidlaw Jr. Honey Bee Research Facility at UC Davis. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Brian Johnson checks out a frame at the Harry H. Laidlaw Jr. Honey Bee Research Facility at UC Davis. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Brian Johnson checks out a frame at the Harry H. Laidlaw Jr. Honey Bee Research Facility at UC Davis. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Wednesday, February 15, 2012 at 9:21 PM

The Good, the Bad and the Bugly

jamescareyhp

"The Good, the Bad, and the Bugly." That's one of the topics at the next meeting of the Northern California Entomology Society, to be held from 9:15 a.m. to 3 p.m., Thursday, May 6  in the Harry H. Laidlaw Jr. Honey Bee Research Facility at UC...

Robbin Thorp
Robbin Thorp

NATIVE POLLINATOR SPECIALIST Robbin Thorp, emeritus professor of entomology at UC Davis, will discuss "Native Bees as Pollinators" at the Nor Cal Entomology Society meeting. On his screen is a photo he took of the endangered Franklin's bumble bee. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The Medfly
The Medfly

THE MEDFLY, aka Mediterranean fruit fly (Ceratitis capitata), will be in the spotlight at the Nor Cal Entomology Society. (Photo by Jack Kelly Clark, UC Division of Agriculture and Natural Resources)

Posted on Friday, April 30, 2010 at 5:54 PM

The Predator and the Prey

James Harwood

If you've ever wondered about the relationship between predator biodiversity and herbivore suppression, that subject is on tap Wednesday, Jan. 27 at UC Davis. The UC Davis Department of Entomology will host associate professor William Snyder (right)...

James Harwood
James Harwood

GRADUATE STUDENTS James Harwood (shown) and Amy Morice, who study with major professor James Carey of the UC Davis Department of Entomology, devote their lunch hours to Webcasting the departmental seminars. Here Harwood readies the equipment prior to a seminar. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Tuesday, January 26, 2010 at 5:36 PM

Medfly and Moth Wars

James Carey

James R. Carey is used to dissent. The entomology professor at the University of California, Davis, fervently believes that the Mediterranean fruit fly and light brown apple moth, two exotic and invasive pests, have long been established in California...

James Carey
James Carey

UC DAVIS ENTOMOLOGIST James Carey believes that the light brown apple moth has long been established in California and cannot be eradicated. He is featured in the Jan. 8 edition of Science Magazine in a NewsFocus piece headlined "From Medfly to Moth: Raising a Buzz of Dissent." (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Light Brown Apple Moth
Light Brown Apple Moth

LIGHT BROWN APPLE MOTH (adult shown) is a native of Australia. Its larvae have voracious appetites and feed on more than 2000 plant species. (Photo courtesy of the U.S. Department of Agriculture)

Posted on Thursday, January 7, 2010 at 6:00 PM

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