Cooperative Extension San Joaquin County
University of California
Cooperative Extension San Joaquin County

Posts Tagged: camouflage

Quick! Find the Damselfly!

This female damselfly, Argia vivida, can barely be distinguished from the twig she's resting on. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Quick! Find the damselfly! This damselfly (below)  is so camouflaged that it's difficult to see her. Her? She's a female Argia vivida, as identified by Lynn Kimsey, director of the Bohart Museum of Entomology and professor of entomology at UC...

This female damselfly, Argia vivida, can barely be distinguished from the twig she's resting on. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
This female damselfly, Argia vivida, can barely be distinguished from the twig she's resting on. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

This female damselfly, Argia vivida, can barely be distinguished from the twig she's resting on. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Wednesday, April 1, 2015 at 5:53 PM
Tags: Argia vivida (1), Benicia (12), camouflage (3), damselfy (1), Greg Fareofelas (1), Lynn Kimsey (254)

Perfect Camouflage

Camouflaged praying mantis. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

What a perfect camouflage! Have you ever seen a green praying mantis hiding among the green growth in your garden? Concealed. Disguised. Camouflaged. The praying mantis is a patient insect. It will lurk for hours in its familiar prayer-like position,...

Camouflaged praying mantis. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Camouflaged praying mantis. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Camouflaged praying mantis. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Exposed! Praying mantis peering around green stems. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Exposed! Praying mantis peering around green stems. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Exposed! Praying mantis peering around green stems. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Monday, July 21, 2014 at 10:59 PM

What's for Dinner?

Camouflaged

The praying mantis isn't at all concerned about culinary choices. It doesn't worry about who's coming to dinner, only that dinner will come. This aggressive, predatory insect will eat just about anything it can get its claws on, entomologists agree....

Camouflaged
Camouflaged

The praying mantis, camouflaged, lies in wait. Hmmm, is that camera edible?(Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Waiting for dinner
Waiting for dinner

A praying mantis awaits prey. Note its forelegs with strong spikes for grabbing and grasping prey. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Monday, October 6, 2008 at 2:48 PM
 
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