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Cooperative Extension San Joaquin County
University of California
Cooperative Extension San Joaquin County

UC Cooperative Extension

ACP (Asian citrus psyllid) found in San Joaquin county

AsianCitrusPsyllid1
The ACP (Asian citrus psyllid) was found in Lodi and Manteca.  Click here to find out how you can help prevent the spread of this unwanted pest and what to do if you think you have it.

Who We Are

Across California, the University of California’s 64 Cooperative Extension offices are local problem-solving centers. We are the bridge between local issues and the power of UC research. Our county-based staff is part of the community – we live and work in the areas we serve.

More than 300 campus-based specialists and county-based farm, home and youth advisors work as teams to bring practical, unbiased, science-based answers to problems across California.

As part of the agricultural community, we help farmers develop more-efficient growing methods, solve pest management problems and develop crops and irrigation methods that use less water.

As stewards of the land, we help develop smart water-use strategies, develop wildfire education and help preserve natural areas and farmland.

As advocates for healthy communities, we promote healthy diets and exercise for better health, help Californians learn to choose the most nutritious foods and help shape the citizens of tomorrow through the 4-H Youth Development Program.

And thousands of volunteers extend the reach of our work through the Master Gardener Program and the California 4-H Youth Development Program.

We work in full partnership with federal, state, county and private resources.

We are stewards, problem-solvers, catalysts, collaborators and educators.

We are UC Cooperative Extension.

UC Blogs

Moths, Microscopes and Insect Scientists: They All Go Together at Bohart Museum Open House

Moth Night at the Bohart Museum is fun and educational. Here two youngsters learn the differences between moths and butterflies at last year's event. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Moths, a magnificent microscope (scanning electron microscope) and friendly scientists--what could be better than that? How about free hot chocolate, herbal tea and cookies? The Bohart Museum of Entomology open house on Saturday night, July 22, promises...

Posted on Friday, July 21, 2017 at 5:43 PM

Not a Good Way to Welcome an Admiral

A territorial male long-horned bee, probably Melissodes agilis, targets a Red Admiral, Vanessa atalanta. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

It was not a good way to welcome an admiral. The Red Admiral butterfly, that is. The Vanessa atalanta fluttered into our pollinator garden on Sunday, July 16 in Vacaville, Calif., and touched down on a Mexican sunflower (Tithonia). The warmth of...

Posted on Thursday, July 20, 2017 at 5:35 PM

Bruce's Big Battle at Briggs: 15 Minutes of Aim!

Distinguished professor Bruce Hammock, who holds a joint appointment with the UC Davis Department of Entomology and Nematology and the UC Davis Comprehensive Cancer Center, gets drenched. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

What do professors do for fun and camaraderie? Bruce Hammock, distinguished professor at the University of California, Davis, who holds a joint appointment with the Department of Entomology and Nematology and the UC Davis Comprehensive Cancer Center,...

Posted on Wednesday, July 19, 2017 at 6:35 PM

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Director:
Brent A Holtz Ph.D.

1040

San Joaquin County Cooperative Extension
Robert J. Cabral Ag Center

2101 E. Earhart Avenue, Ste 200, Stockton, CA 95206
Phone: (209) 953-6100
Fax: (209) 953-6128
e-mail: cesanjoaquin@ucdavis.edu
Click here for a map

Ag Center May 2008

Calendar

Event Name
Date
8/22/2017

UC Blogs

UC Cooperative Extension specialist Beth Grafton-Cardwell is one of two UC ANR scientists who have developed the Science for Citrus Health website. UC puts high science online in easy-to-read citrus research updates
Posted 7/18/2017 - California citrus farmers have their ears perked for all news related to Asian citrus psyllid (ACP) and huanglongbing (HLB) disease, but the very latest advances have been available only in highly technical research journals, often by subscription...

Local Americorps watershed steward Alejandara Prendergast disects a salmon with campers Caging kids! The next generation of wildlife biologists
Posted 7/17/2017 - As 10-year-old Dominic Vargas crouched on the ground, in a cage not much larger than himself, trying to forage for tasty treats (candy) on the woodland floor...CRASH! The cage door came falling down and he realized that he had inadvertently tripped a...

Professor Justin Brashares (center) and members of his lab utilize tagging, drones, and GPS technologies to track the movement of carnivores and their prey. (Jim Block) A quiet carnivore recovery
Posted 6/30/2017 - California land managers and wildlife experts are increasingly tasked with managing the return of long-suppressed predators to the landscape, including wolves, mountain lions, badgers, foxes, coyotes, bobcats, and bears. As a result, California is poised...

An abandoned orange grove in Florida. (Photo: USDA) Citrus farmers bracing to battle huanglongbing
Posted 6/28/2017 - Two more trees infected with huanglongbing (HLB) disease were identified and destroyed in the days before UC Cooperative Extension and the Citrus Research Board kicked off their spring Citrus Growers Education Seminar in Exeter June 27. The new...

Traveling in two vans, 10 students, a teachers' assistant and two professors are following the course of California water. Future water leaders soak up irrigation information
Posted 6/23/2017 - University of California students are taking a long journey through California to trace the state's complicated and critical water supply. The recent graduates and upper-division co-eds from UC Merced, UC Santa Cruz, UC Berkeley and UC Davis are part of...

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