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Cooperative Extension San Joaquin County
University of California
Cooperative Extension San Joaquin County

UC Cooperative Extension

ACP (Asian citrus psyllid) found in San Joaquin county

AsianCitrusPsyllid1
The ACP (Asian citrus psyllid) was found in Lodi and Manteca.  Click here to find out how you can help prevent the spread of this unwanted pest and what to do if you think you have it.

Who We Are

Across California, the University of California’s 64 Cooperative Extension offices are local problem-solving centers. We are the bridge between local issues and the power of UC research. Our county-based staff is part of the community – we live and work in the areas we serve.

More than 300 campus-based specialists and county-based farm, home and youth advisors work as teams to bring practical, unbiased, science-based answers to problems across California.

As part of the agricultural community, we help farmers develop more-efficient growing methods, solve pest management problems and develop crops and irrigation methods that use less water.

As stewards of the land, we help develop smart water-use strategies, develop wildfire education and help preserve natural areas and farmland.

As advocates for healthy communities, we promote healthy diets and exercise for better health, help Californians learn to choose the most nutritious foods and help shape the citizens of tomorrow through the 4-H Youth Development Program.

And thousands of volunteers extend the reach of our work through the Master Gardener Program and the California 4-H Youth Development Program.

We work in full partnership with federal, state, county and private resources.

We are stewards, problem-solvers, catalysts, collaborators and educators.

We are UC Cooperative Extension.

UC Blogs

Well, Hello, Bumble Bee...

A black-tailed bumble bee, Bombus melanopygus, peers at the photographer. This one buzzed into Robbin Thorp's office at UC Davis on Valentine's Day, Feb. 14. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

What are the odds? Native pollinator specialist Robbin Thorp, distinguished emeritus professor of entomology at UC Davis, greeted a visitor on Feb. 14 in his office in the Harry H. Laidlaw Jr. Honey Bee Research Facility. This visitor didn't talk,...

Posted on Thursday, February 23, 2017 at 5:50 PM

A Story No One Is Letting Robert Washino Forget

Sharing coffee last week at the Bohart Museum were  medical entomologist Robert Washino, emeritus professor and former chair of the UC Davis Department of Entomology (now Entomology and Nematology) and Lynn Kimsey, director of the Bohart Museum and UC Davis professor of entomology. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

It's a story that no one is letting him forget. Noted medical entomologist Robert "Bob" Washino, emeritus professor of entomology and a veteran academic administrator at UC Davis, was hanging out in his back yard in Davis last spring when an aedine...

Posted on Wednesday, February 22, 2017 at 2:55 PM

Highly Successful Biodiversity Museum Day

Häagen-Dazs Honey Bee Haven, a bee friendly garden, drew scores of visitors. It's located on Bee Biology Road, west of the central campus. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

They saw bugs. They saw bones. They saw honey bees. They saw hawks. Those were just a few of the offering at the sixth annual UC Davis Biodiversity Museum Day, held Saturday, Feb. 18. More than 3000 visitors checked out the offerings. The free...

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Director:
Brent A Holtz Ph.D.

1040

San Joaquin County Cooperative Extension
Robert J. Cabral Ag Center

2101 E. Earhart Avenue, Ste 200, Stockton, CA 95206
Phone: (209) 953-6100
Fax: (209) 953-6128
e-mail: cesanjoaquin@ucdavis.edu
Click here for a map

Ag Center May 2008

Calendar

Event Name
Date
5/23/2017
8/22/2017

UC Blogs

Quinn would like to put collars on urban coyotes to study whether the animals move away from locations after hazing. New mobile app to track close encounters with coyotes
Posted 2/13/2017 - As urban coyote numbers rise, the animals are increasingly crossing paths with residents. There have been police reports of coyotes attacking pets and even people, but there has been no place to report casual coyote encounters. Now there is a new...

A fallen almond tree that was weakened by Ganoderma fungus. (Photo: Bob Johnson) A foreboding fungus is threatening orchards in the San Joaquin Valley
Posted 1/17/2017 - When an almond tree keels over in a mature orchard, it could be a sign of something ominous. UC scientists are tracking a fungal infection in San Joaquin Valley almond trees that can cost farmers hundreds of thousands of dollars in lost...

Ph.D. candidate Deirdre Griffin at a research plot at the Russell Ranch Sustainable Agriculture Facility In a new study biochar helps yields, but only in the short term
Posted 1/11/2017 - Adding biochar to a farm's field is an irreversible decision, so understanding its long-term impacts is essential for farmers to make informed decisions. Biochar, a charcoal created from organic materials burned at high temperatures and added as a soil...

Cattle grazing in Mariposa County. Grass-fed beef production a possible money-maker for Central California ranchers
Posted 12/19/2016 - The health benefits of grass-fed beef are well documented. Meat from cattle that live out their lives grazing on rangeland before being processed has more beta-carotene, vitamin E and omega-3 fatty acids than the meat from animals finished at feed...

This NEXRAD map shows where migrating waterfowl are gathered in rice fields, herbaceous wetlands and other agricultural land. Weather radar helps researchers track bird flu
Posted 12/7/2016 - The same weather radar technology used to predict rain is now giving UC researchers the ability to track wild birds that could carry the avian influenza virus. Avian influenza, which kills chickens, turkeys and other birds, can take a significant...

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